Steppers are great, but if you have poor cables you’ll spend all day troubleshooting connections.  A nice set of polarized cables will help you spend all your time troubleshooting other things.

Update from the “D’oh” files: Though I suggested in the post that you might be able to get away with undersized pins, I’ve since found that this type of connector depends more on the pins than the plastic housing to make a tight friction-mate.  Make sure to purchase matching pin/socket and plug/receptacle components.

Required know-how:

  • soldering

Tools and materials:

  • Electrical tape
  • Hot glue, glue gun
  • Solder, soldering iron
  • “Helping hands” part-holder
  • 3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable
    • (MCM 71335K93)
  • At least 6 ea male and female “plug and receptacle” connectors (usually sold by 10 ct.)
    • (MCM 69295K84, 69295K64)
  • At least 36 ea male and female “pin and socket” connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.)
    • (MCM 69295K23, 69295K33)

*We sourced from MCM because we had other things to order there.  You could probably find this stuff cheaper elsewhere, although I couldn’t find another source that will sell cut lengths of 24/6 cable.

Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)

"Helping hands" are a must!

Step 1:

Prep a length of multiconductor cable for each motor you plan to connect. I chose to make 3 x 4′ lengths. It’s a good idea to keep these wires on the short side so that they don’t add too much resistance to the circuit.

Strip ~2″ of outer insulation from both ends of each multiconductor segment. Next, strip ~1/4″ from each of the 6 individual conductors you find inside. You should also twist and “tin” (pre-solder) the tips of these exposed conductors so that they’ll be easier to work with.

Grab your bag of pins/sockets and solder one to every conductor, making sure to define one end of the cable segment as male and the other as female. You could probably get away with crimping, but I didn’t have the right tool in the shop.

Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)

In Chicago we call that "Blagojevich crooked".

Step 2:

Stick the male pin wires into the back of the plug connector, then feed the female socket wires through the back of the receptacle connector.  The gender assignment of the connectors is counter intuitive, so refer to the image above.

Now take a look at the front of your plugs. You’ll note that the pins do no lock into place very well (especially if you ordered the wrong size pins like I did). To reinforce alignment, plug the two ends of your cable into one another. You should also check to make sure that your color coding is consistent:  each color should connect to itself.

Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)

Finished cables.

Step 3:

Make sure that all pins are fully engaged with one another by looking at the plugs from the back. If a conductor is sticking out too far, you can push it back in with the edge of a jeweler’s screwdriver. Once you’re satisfied that the wires are all mating correctly, bend the conductors to one side at the back of the plug and squirt some hot glue into each conductor channel.

Once the glue cools, twist the conductors and tape for added reinforcement.  If you find that one of your pins is still positioned incorrectly, heat it up with the iron and reposition while the glue is warm.

Step 4:

Repeat steps 1-3 for your 6 short lengths of cable.  This time you’ll only be adding a plug or receptacle to one end of each length.  Three of these cables will get soldered directly to your stepper motor wires (make these male).  The other three will be connected to the motor outputs on your machine controller (make these female).  If you did the genders right, you’ll be able to connect the short machine controller cable >> long cable >> short motor cable.

Bonus!

I’ve seen some talk online about slightly more robust ethernet cables that come in 24 gauge.  The standard cable is 22AWG, which is just one step away from the size recommended by hobbycnc.com.  I’m still a little fuzzy on the math, but you might be able to get away with ethernet wiring for smaller motors.  It would sure be convenient, plus there’s two extra conductors for a limit switch.  Make sure you get stranded as opposed to solid core to avoid motion stress breakage.  Let us know if this route works/burns down your garage.

 

Toggle History

Revised 6 years ago
Steppers are great, but if you have poor cables you'll spend all day troubleshooting connections.  A nice set of polarized cables will help you spend all your time troubleshooting other things. <strong>Required know-how:</strong> <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> <strong> </strong> <strong>Tools and materials:</strong> <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable <ul> <li>(MCM 71335K93)</li> </ul> </li> <li>At least 6 ea male and female "plug and receptacle" connectors (usually sold by 10 ct.) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K84, 69295K64)</li> </ul> </li> <li>At least 36 ea male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K23, 69295K33)</li> </ul> </li> </ul> *We sourced from MCM because we had other things to order there.  You could probably find this stuff cheaper elsewhere, although I couldn't find another source that will sell cut lengths of 24/6 cable. [caption id="attachment_679" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="&quot;Helping hands&quot; are a must!"]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-679" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 1:</strong> Prep a length of multiconductor cable for each motor you plan to connect. I chose to make 3 x 4' lengths. It's a good idea to keep these wires on the short side so that they don't add too much resistance to the circuit. Strip ~2" of outer insulation from both ends of each multiconductor segment. Next, strip ~1/4" from each of the 6 individual conductors you find inside. You should also twist and "tin" (pre-solder) the tips of these exposed conductors so that they'll be easier to work with. Grab your bag of pins/sockets and solder one to every conductor, making sure to define one end of the cable segment as male and the other as female. You could probably get away with crimping, but I didn't have the right tool in the shop. [caption id="attachment_680" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="In Chicago we call that &quot;Blagojevich crooked&quot;."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-680" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 2:</strong> <strong> </strong> Stick the male pin wires into the back of the plug connector, then feed the female socket wires through the back of the receptacle connector.  The gender assignment of the connectors is counter intuitive, so refer to the image above. Now take a look at the front of your plugs. You'll note that the pins do no lock into place very well (especially if you ordered the wrong size pins like I did). To reinforce alignment, plug the two ends of your cable into one another. You should also check to make sure that your color coding is consistent:  each color should connect to itself. [caption id="attachment_681" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Finished cables."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-681" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 3:</strong> Make sure that all pins are fully engaged with one another by looking at the plugs from the back. If a conductor is sticking out too far, you can push it back in with the edge of a jewler's screwdriver. Once you're satisfied that the wires are all mating correctly, bend the conductors to one side at the back of the plug and squirt some hot glue into each conductor channel. Once the glue cools, twist the conductors and tape for added reinforcement.  If you find that one of your pins is still positioned incorrectly, heat it up with the iron and reposition while the glue is warm. <strong>Step 4:</strong> Repeat steps 1-3 for your 6 short lengths of cable.  This time you'll only be adding a plug <em>or</em> receptacle to one end of each length.  Three of these cables will get soldered directly to your stepper motor wires (make these male).  The other three will be connected to the motor outputs on your machine controller (make these female).  If you did the genders right, you'll be able to connect the short machine controller cable &gt;&gt; long cable &gt;&gt; short motor cable.<strong> </strong> <strong>Bonus!</strong> I've seen some talk online about slightly more robust ethernet cables that come in 24 gauge.  The standard cable is 22AWG, which is just one step away from the size recommended by hobbycnc.com.  I'm still a little fuzzy on the math, but you might be able to get away with ethernet wiring for smaller motors.  It would sure be convenient, plus there's two extra conductors for a limit switch.  Make sure you get stranded as opposed to solid core to avoid motion stress breakage.  Let us know if this route works/burns down your garage.<strong> </strong> &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
Steppers are great, but if you have poor cables you'll spend all day troubleshooting connections.  A nice set of polarized cables will help you spend all your time troubleshooting other things. <strong>Required know-how:</strong> <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> <strong> </strong> <strong>Tools and materials:</strong> <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable <ul> <li>(MCM 71335K93)</li> </ul> </li> <li>At least 6 ea male and female "plug and receptacle" wire connectors (usually sold by 10 ct.) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K84, 69295K64)</li> </ul> </li> <li>At least 36 ea male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K23, 69295K33)</li> </ul> </li> </ul> *We sourced from MCM because we had other things to order there.  You could probably find this stuff cheaper elsewhere, although I couldn't find another source that will sell cut lengths of 24/6 cable. [caption id="attachment_679" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="&quot;Helping hands&quot; are a must!"]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-679" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 1:</strong> Prep a length of multiconductor cable for each motor you plan to connect. I chose to make 3 x 4' lengths. It's a good idea to keep these wires on the short side so that they don't add too much resistance to the circuit. Strip ~2" of outer insulation from both ends of each multiconductor segment. Next, strip ~1/4" from each of the 6 individual conductors you find inside. You should also twist and "tin" (pre-solder) the tips of these exposed conductors so that they'll be easier to work with. Grab your bag of pins/sockets and solder one to every conductor, making sure to define one end of the cable segment as male and the other as female. You could probably get away with crimping, but I didn't have the right tool in the shop. [caption id="attachment_680" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="In Chicago we call that &quot;Blagojevich crooked&quot;."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-680" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 2:</strong> <strong> </strong> Stick the male pin wires into the back of the plug connector, then feed the female socket wires through the back of the receptacle connector.  The gender assignment of the connectors is counter intuitive, so refer to the image above. Now take a look at the front of your plugs. You'll note that the pins do no lock into place very well (especially if you ordered the wrong size pins like I did). To reinforce alignment, plug the two ends of your cable into one another. You should also check to make sure that your color coding is consistent:  each color should connect to itself. [caption id="attachment_681" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Finished cables."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-681" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 3:</strong> Make sure that all pins are fully engaged with one another by looking at the plugs from the back. If a conductor is sticking out too far, you can push it back in with the edge of a jewler's screwdriver. Once you're satisfied that the wires are all mating correctly, bend the conductors to one side at the back of the plug and squirt some hot glue into each conductor channel. Once the glue cools, twist the conductors and tape for added reinforcement.  If you find that one of your pins is still positioned incorrectly, heat it up with the iron and reposition while the glue is warm. <strong>Step 4:</strong> Repeat steps 1-3 for your 6 short lengths of cable.  This time you'll only be adding a plug to one end of each length.  Three of these cables will get soldered directly to your stepper motor wires (make these male).  The other three will be connected to the motor outputs on your machine controller (make these female).  If you did the genders right, you'll be able to connect the short machine controller cable &gt;&gt; long cable &gt;&gt; short motor cable.<strong> </strong> <strong>Bonus!</strong> I've seen some talk online about slightly more robust ethernet cables that come in 24 gauge.  The standard cable is 22AWG, which is just one step away from the size recommended by hobbycnc.com.  I'm still a little fuzzy on the math, but you might be able to get away with ethernet wiring for smaller motors.  It would sure be convenient, plus there's two extra conductors for a limit switch.  Make sure you get stranded as opposed to solid core to avoid motion stress breakage.  Let us know if this route works/burns down your garage.<strong> </strong> &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
Steppers are great, but if you have poor cables you'll spend all day troubleshooting connections.  A nice set of polarized cables will help you spend all your time troubleshooting other things. <strong>Required know-how:</strong> <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> <strong> </strong> <strong>Tools and materials:</strong> <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable <ul> <li>(MCM 71335K93)</li> </ul> </li> <li>6 <li>At least 6 ea male wire connectors (plugs) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K84)</li> </ul> </li> <li>6and female "plug and receptacle" wire connectors (receptacles)(usually sold by 10 ct.) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K84, 69295K64)</li> </ul> </li> <li>At least 36 eachea male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K23, 69295K33)</li> </ul> </li> </ul> *We sourced from MCM because we had other things to order there.  You could probably find this stuff cheaper elsewhere, although I couldn't find another source that will sell cut lengths of 24/6 cable. [caption id="attachment_679" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="&quot;Helping hands&quot; are a must!"]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-679" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 1:</strong> Prep a length of multiconductor cable for each motor you plan to connect. I chose to make 3 x 4' lengths. It's a good idea to keep these wires on the short side so that they don't add too much resistance to the circuit. Strip ~2" of outer insulation from both ends of each multiconductor segment. Next, strip ~1/4" from each of the 6 individual conductors you find inside. You should also twist and "tin" (pre-solder) the tips of these exposed conductors so that they'll be easier to work with. Grab your bag of pins/sockets and solder one to every conductor, making sure to define one end of the cable segment as male and the other as female. You could probably get away with crimping, but I didn't have the right tool in the shop. [caption id="attachment_680" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="In Chicago we call that &quot;Blagojevich crooked&quot;."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-680" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 2:</strong> <strong> </strong> Stick the male pin wires into the back of the plug connector, then feed the female socket wires through the back of the receptacle connector.  The gender assignment of the connectors is counter intuitive, so refer to the image above. Now take a look at the front of your plugs. You'll note that the pins do no lock into place very well (especially if you ordered the wrong size pins like I did). To reinforce alignment, plug the two ends of your cable into one another. You should also check to make sure that your color coding is consistent:  each color should connect to itself. [caption id="attachment_681" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Finished cables."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-681" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 3:</strong> Make sure that all pins are fully engaged with one another by looking at the plugs from the back. If a conductor is sticking out too far, you can push it back in with the edge of a jewler's screwdriver. Once you're satisfied that the wires are all mating correctly, bend the conductors to one side at the back of the plug and squirt some hot glue into each conductor channel. Once the glue cools, twist the conductors and tape for added reinforcement.  If you find that one of your pins is still positioned incorrectly, heat it up with the iron and reposition while the glue is warm. <strong>Step 4:</strong> Repeat steps 1-3 for your 6 short lengths of cable.  This time you'll only be adding a plug to one end of each length.  Three of these cables will get soldered directly to your stepper motor wires (make these male).  The other three will be connected to the motor outputs on your machine controller (make these female).  If you did the genders right, you'll be able to connect the short machine controller cable &gt;&gt; long cable &gt;&gt; short motor cable.<strong> </strong> <strong>Bonus!</strong> I've seen some talk online about slightly more robust ethernet cables that come in 24 gauge.  The standard cable is 22AWG, which is just one step away from the size recommended by hobbycnc.com.  I'm still a little fuzzy on the math, but you might be able to get away with ethernet wiring for smaller motors.  It would sure be convenient, plus there's two extra conductors for a limit switch.  Make sure you get stranded as opposed to solid core to avoid motion stress breakage.  Let us know if this route works/burns down your garage.<strong> </strong> &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
Steppers are great, but if you have poor cables you'll spend all day troubleshooting connections.  A nice set of polarized cables will help you spend all your time troubleshooting other things. <strong>Required know-how:</strong> <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> <strong> </strong> <strong>Tools and materials:</strong> <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable <ul> <li>(MCM 71335K93)</li> </ul> </li> <li>6 male wire connectors (plugs) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K84)</li> </ul> </li> <li>6 female wire connectors (receptacles) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K64)</li> </ul> </li> <li>At least 36 each male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K23, 69295K33)</li> </ul> </li> </ul> *We sourced from MCM because we had other things to order there.  You could probably find this stuff cheaper elsewhere, although I couldn't find another source that will sell cut lengths of 24/6 cable. [caption id="attachment_679" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="&quot;Helping hands&quot; are a must!"]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-679" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 1:</strong> Prep a length of multiconductor cable for each motor you plan to connect. I chose to make 3 x 4' lengths. It's a good idea to keep these wires on the short side so that they don't add too much resistance to the circuit. Strip ~2" of outer insulation from both ends of each multiconductor segment. Next, strip ~1/4" from each of the 6 individual conductors you find inside. You should also twist and "tin" (pre-solder) the tips of these exposed conductors so that they'll be easier to work with. Grab your bag of pins/sockets and solder one to every conductor, making sure to define one end of the cable segment as male and the other as female. You could probably get away with crimping, but I didn't have the right tool in the shop. [caption id="attachment_680" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="In Chicago we call that &quot;Blagojevich crooked&quot;."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-680" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 2:</strong> <strong> </strong> Stick the male pin wires into the back of the plug connector, then feed the female socket wires through the back of the receptacle connector.  The gender assignment of the connectors is counter intuitive, so refer to the image above. Now take a look at the front of your plugs. You'll note that the pins do no lock into place very well (especially if you ordered the wrong size pins like I did). To reinforce alignment, plug the two ends of your cable into one another. You should also check to make sure that your color coding is consistent:  each color should connect to itself. [caption id="attachment_681" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Finished cables."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-681" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 3:</strong> Make sure that all pins are fully engaged with one another by looking at the plugs from the back. If a conductor is sticking out too far, you can push it back in with the edge of a jewler's screwdriver. Once you're satisfied that the wires are all mating correctly, bend the conductors to one side at the back of the plug and squirt some hot glue into each conductor channel. Once the glue cools, twist the conductors and tape for added reinforcement.  If you find that one of your pins is still positioned incorrectly, heat it up with the iron and reposition while the glue is warm. <strong>Step 4:</strong> Repeat steps 1-3 for your 6 short lengths of cable.  This time you'll only be adding a plug to one end of each length.  Three of these cables will get soldered directly to your stepper motor wires (make these male).  The other three will be connected to the motor outputs on your machine controller (make these female).  If you did the genders right, you'll be able to connect the short machine controller cable &gt;&gt; long cable &gt;&gt; short motor cable.<strong> </strong> <strong>Bonus!</strong> I've seen some talk online about slightly more robust ethernet cables that come in 24 gauge.  The standard cable is 22,22AWG, which is just one step away from the size recommended by hobbycnc.com.  I'm still a little fuzzy on the math, but you might be able to get away with ethernet wiring for smaller motors.  It would sure be convenient, plus there's two extra conductors for a limit switch.  Make sure you get stranded as opposed to solid core to avoid motion stress breakage.  Let us know if this route works/burns down your house.<strong>garage.<strong> </strong> &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
Steppers are great, but if you have poor cables you'll spend all day troubleshooting connections.  A nice set of polarized cables will help you spend all your time troubleshooting other things. <strong>Required know-how:</strong> <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> <strong> </strong> <strong>Tools and materials:</strong> <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable <ul> <li>(MCM 71335K93)</li> </ul> </li> <li>6 male wire connectors (plugs) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K84)</li> </ul> </li> <li>6 female wire connectors (receptacles) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K64)</li> </ul> </li> <li>At least 36 each male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K23, 69295K33)</li> </ul> </li> </ul> *We sourced from MCM because we had other things to order there.  You could probably find this stuff cheaper elsewhere, although I couldn't find another source that will sell cut lengths of 24/6 cable. [caption id="attachment_679" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="&quot;Helping hands&quot; are a must!"]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-679" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 1:</strong> Prep a length of multiconductor cable for each motor you plan to connect. I chose to make 3 x 4' lengths. It's a good idea to keep these wires on the short side so that they don't add too much resistance to the circuit. Strip ~2" of outer insulation from both ends of each multiconductor segment. Next, strip ~1/4" from each of the 6 individual conductors you find inside. You should also twist and "tin" (pre-solder) the tips of these exposed conductors so that they'll be easier to work with. Grab your bag of pins/sockets and solder one to every conductor, making sure to define one end of the cable segment as male and the other as female. You could probably get away with crimping, but I didn't have the right tool in the shop. [caption id="attachment_680" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="In Chicago we call that &quot;Blagojevich crooked&quot;."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-680" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 2:</strong> <strong> </strong> Stick the male pin wires into the back of the plug connector, then feed the female socket wires through the back of the receptacle connector.  The gender assignment of the connectors is counter intuitive, so refer to the image above. Now take a look at the front of your plugs. You'll note that the pins do no lock into place very well (especially if you ordered the wrong size pins like I did). To reinforce alignment, plug the two ends of your cable into one another. You should also check to make sure that your color coding is consistent:  each color should connect to itself. [caption id="attachment_681" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Finished cables."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-681" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 3:</strong> Make sure that all pins are fully engaged with one another by looking at the plugs from the back. If a conductor is sticking out too far, you can push it back in with the edge of a jewler's screwdriver. Once you're satisfied that the wires are all mating correctly, bend the conductors to one side at the back of the plug and squirt some hot glue into each conductor channel. Once the glue cools, twist the conductors and tape for added reinforcement.  If you find that one of your pins is still positioned incorrectly, heat it up with the iron and reposition while the glue is warm. <strong>Step 4:</strong> Repeat steps 1-3 for your 6 short lengths of cable.  This time you'll only be adding a plug to one end of each length.  Three of these cables will get soldered directly to your stepper motor wires (make these male).  The other three will be connected to the motor outputs on your machine controller (make these female).  If you did the genders right, you'll be able to connect the short machine controller cable &gt;&gt; long cable &gt;&gt; short motor cable.<strong> </strong> <strong>Bonus!</strong> I've seen some talk online about slightly more robust ethernet cables that come in 24 gauge.  The standard cable is 22, which is just one step away from the size recommended by hobbycnc.com.  I'm still a little fuzzy on the math, but you might be able to get away with ethernet wiring for smaller motors.  It would sure be convenient, plus there's two extra conductors for a limit switch.  Make sure you get stranded as opposed to solid core to avoid motion stress breakage.  Let us know if this route works/burns down your house.<strong> </strong> &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
Steppers are great, but if you have poor cables you'll spend all day troubleshooting connections.  A nice set of polarized cables will help you spend all your time troubleshooting other things. <strong>Required know-how:</strong> <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> <strong> </strong> <strong>Tools and materials:</strong> <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable <ul> <li>(MCM 71335K93)</li> </ul> </li> <li>6 male wire connectors (plugs) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K84)</li> </ul> </li> <li>6 female wire connectors (receptacles) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K64)</li> </ul> </li> <li>At least 36 each male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K23, 69295K33)</li> </ul> </li> </ul> *We sourced from MCM because we had other things to order there.  You could probably find this stuff cheaper elsewhere, although I couldn't find another source that will sell cut lengths of 24/6 cable. [caption id="attachment_679" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="&quot;Helping hands&quot; are a must!"]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-679" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 1:</strong> Prep a length of multiconductor cable for each motor you plan to connect. I chose to make 3 x 4' lengths. It's a good idea to keep these wires on the short side so that they don't add too much resistance to the circuit. Strip ~2" of outer insulation from both ends of each multiconductor segment. Next, strip ~1/4" from each of the 6 individual conductors you find inside. You should also twist and "tin" (pre-solder) the tips of these exposed conductors so that they'll be easier to work with. Grab your bag of pins/sockets and solder one to every conductor, making sure to define one end of the cable segment as male and the other as female. You could probably get away with crimping, but I didn't have the right tool in the shop. [caption id="attachment_680" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="In Chicago we call that &quot;Blagojevich crooked&quot;."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-680" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 2:</strong> <strong> </strong> Stick the male pin wires into the back of the plug connector, then feed the female socket wires through the back of the receptacle connector.  The gender assignment of the connectors is counter intuitive, so refer to the image above. Now take a look at the front of your plugs. You'll note that the pins do no lock into place very well (especially if you ordered the wrong size pins like I did). To reinforce alignment, plug the two ends of your cable into one another. You should also check to make sure that your color coding is consistent:  each color should connect to itself. [caption id="attachment_681" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Finished cables."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-681" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 3:</strong> Make sure that all pins are fully engaged with one another by looking at the plugs from the back. If a conductor is sticking out too far, you can push it back in with the edge of a jewler's screwdriver. Once you're satisfied that the wires are all mating correctly, bend the conductors to one side at the back of the plug and squirt some hot glue into each conductor channel. Once the glue cools, twist the conductors and tape for added reinforcement.  If you find that one of your pins is still positioned incorrectly, heat it up with the iron and reposition while the glue is warm. <strong>Step 4:</strong> Repeat steps 1-3 for your 6 short lengths of cable.  This time you'll only be adding a plug to one end of each length.  Three of these cables will get soldered directly to your stepper motor wires (make these male).  The other three will be connected to the motor outputs on your machine controller (make these female).  If you did the genders right, you'll be able to connect the short machine controller cable &gt;&gt; long cable &gt;&gt; short motor cable.<strong> </strong> &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
<strong>Required know-how:</strong> <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> <strong> </strong> <strong>Tools and materials:</strong> <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable <ul> <li>(MCM 71335K93)</li> </ul> </li> <li>6 male wire connectors (plugs) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K84)</li> </ul> </li> <li>6 female wire connectors (receptacles) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K64)</li> </ul> </li> <li>At least 36 each male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K23, 69295K33)</li> </ul> </li> </ul> *We sourced from MCM because we had other things to order there.  You could probably find this stuff cheaper elsewhere, although I couldn't find another source that will sell cut lengths of 24/6. &nbsp;24/6 cable. [caption id="attachment_679" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="&quot;Helping hands&quot; are a must!"]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-679" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 1:</strong> Prep a length of multiconductor cable for each motor you plan to connect. I chose to make 3 x 4' lengths. It's a good idea to keep these wires on the short side so that they don't add too much resistance to the circuit. Strip ~2" of outer insulation from both ends of each multiconductor segment. Next, strip ~1/4" from each of the 6 individual conductors you find inside. You should also twist and "tin" (pre-solder) the tips of these exposed conductors so that they'll be easier to work with. Grab your bag of pins/sockets and solder one to every conductor, making sure to define one end of the cable segment as male and the other as female. You could probably get away with crimping, but I didn't have the right tool in the shop. [caption id="attachment_680" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="In Chicago we call that &quot;Blagojevich crooked&quot;."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-680" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 2:</strong> <strong> </strong> Stick the male pin wires into the back of the plug connector, then feed the female socket wires through the back of the receptacle connector.  The gender assignment of the connectors is counter intuitive, so refer to the image above. Now take a look at the front of your plugs. You'll note that the pins do no lock into place very well (especially if you ordered the wrong size pins like I did). To reinforce alignment, plug the two ends of your cable into one another. You should also check to make sure that your color coding is consistent:  each color should connect to itself. [caption id="attachment_681" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Finished cables."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-681" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 3:</strong> Make sure that all pins are fully engaged with one another by looking at the plugs from the back. If a conductor is sticking out too far, you can push it back in with the edge of a jewler's screwdriver. Once you're satisfied that the wires are all mating correctly, bend the conductors to one side at the back of the plug and squirt some hot glue into each conductor channel. Once the glue cools, twist the conductors and tape for added reinforcement.  If you find that one of your pins is still positioned incorrectly, heat it up with the iron and reposition while the glue is warm. <strong>Step 4:</strong> Repeat steps 1-3 for your 6 short lengths of cable.  This time you'll only be adding a plug to one end of each length.  Three of these cables will get soldered directly to your stepper motor wires (make these male).  The other three will be connected to the motor outputs on your machine controller (make these female).  If you did the genders right, you'll be able to connect the short machine controller cable &gt;&gt; long cable &gt;&gt; short motor cable.<strong> </strong> &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
<strong>Required know-how:</strong> <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> <strong> </strong> <strong>Tools and materials:</strong> &nbsp; <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable (24/6)</li><ul> <li>(MCM 71335K93)</li> </ul> </li> <li>6 male wire connectors (plugs)</li>(plugs) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K84)</li> </ul> </li> <li>6 female wire connectors (receptacles)</li>(receptacles) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K64)</li> </ul> </li> <li>At least 36 each male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.)</li>ct.) <ul> <li>(MCM 69295K23, 69295K33)</li> </ul> </li> </ul> *We sourced from MCM because we had other things to order there.  You could probably find this stuff cheaper elsewhere, although I couldn't find another source that will sell cut lengths of 24/6. &nbsp; [caption id="attachment_679" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="&quot;Helping hands&quot; are a must!"]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-679" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 1:</strong> Prep a length of multiconductor cable for each motor you plan to connect. I chose to make 3 x 4' lengths. It's a good idea to keep these wires on the short side so that they don't add too much resistance to the circuit. Strip ~2" of outer insulation from both ends of each multiconductor segment. Next, strip ~1/4" from each of the 6 individual conductors you find inside. You should also twist and "tin" (pre-solder) the tips of these exposed conductors so that they'll be easier to work with. Grab your bag of pins/sockets and solder one to every conductor, making sure to define one end of the cable segment as male and the other as female. You could probably get away with crimping, but I didn't have the right tool in the shop. [caption id="attachment_680" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="In Chicago we call that &quot;Blagojevich crooked&quot;."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-680" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 2:</strong> <strong> </strong> Stick the male pin wires into the back of the plug connector, then feed the female socket wires through the back of the receptacle connector.  The gender assignment of the connectors is counter intuitive, so refer to the image above. Now take a look at the front of your plugs. You'll note that the pins do no lock into place very well (especially if you ordered the wrong size pins like I did). To reinforce alignment, plug the two ends of your cable into one another. You should also check to make sure that your color coding is consistent:  each color should connect to itself. [caption id="attachment_681" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Finished cables."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-681" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 3:</strong> Make sure that all pins are fully engaged with one another by looking at the plugs from the back. If a conductor is sticking out too far, you can push it back in with the edge of a jewler's screwdriver. Once you're satisfied that the wires are all mating correctly, bend the conductors to one side at the back of the plug and squirt some hot glue into each conductor channel. Once the glue cools, twist the conductors and tape for added reinforcement.  If you find that one of your pins is still positioned incorrectly, heat it up with the iron and reposition while the glue is warm. <strong>Step 4:</strong> Repeat steps 1-3 for your 6 short lengths of cable.  This time you'll only be adding a plug to one end of each length.  Three of these cables will get soldered directly to your stepper motor wires (make these male).  The other three will be connected to the motor outputs on your machine controller (make these female).  If you did the genders right, you'll be able to connect the short machine controller cable &gt;&gt; long cable &gt;&gt; short motor cable.<strong> </strong> &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
<strong>Required know-how:</strong> <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> <strong> </strong> <strong>Tools and materials:</strong> &nbsp; <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable (24/6)</li> <li>6 male wire connectors (plugs)</li> <li>6 female wire connectors (receptacles)</li> <li>At least 36 each male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.)</li> </ul> &nbsp; [caption id="attachment_679" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="&quot;Helping hands&quot; are a must!"]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-679" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 1:</strong> Prep a length of multiconductor cable for each motor you plan to connect. I chose to make 3 x 4' lengths. It's a good idea to keep these wires on the short side so that they don't add too much resistance to the circuit. Strip ~2" of outer insulation from both ends of each multiconductor segment. Next, strip ~1/4" from each of the 6 individual conductors you find inside. You should also twist and "tin" (pre-solder) the tips of these exposed conductors so that they'll be easier to work with. Grab your bag of pins/sockets and solder one to every conductor, making sure to define one end of the cable segment as male and the other as female. You could probably get away with crimping, but I didn't have the right tool in the shop. [caption id="attachment_680" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="In Chicago we call that &quot;Blagojevich crooked&quot;."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-680" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 2:</strong> <strong> </strong> Stick the male pin wires into the back of the plug connector, then feed the female socket wires through the back of the receptacle connector.  The gender assignment of the connectors is counter intuitive, so refer to the image above. Now take a look at the front of your plugs. You'll note that the pins do no lock into place very well (especially if you ordered the wrong size pins like I did). To reinforce alignment, plug the two ends of your cable into one another. You should also check to make sure that your color coding is consistent:  each color should connect to itself. [caption id="attachment_681" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Finished cables."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-681" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 3:</strong> Make sure that all pins are fully engaged with one another by looking at the plugs from the back. If a conductor is sticking out too far, you can push it back in with the edge of a jewler's screwdriver. Once you're satisfied that the wires are all mating correctly, bend the conductors to one side at the back of the plug and squirt some hot glue into each conductor channel. Once the glue cools, twist the conductors and tape for added reinforcement.  If you find that one of your pins is still positioned incorrectly, heat it up with the iron and reposition while the glue is warm. <strong>Step 4:</strong> Repeat steps 1-3 for your 6 short lengths of cable (I made them 12" long). cable.  This time you'll only be adding a plug to one end of each length.  Three of these lengthscables will get soldered directly to your stepper motor wires. wires (make these male).  The other three will be connected to the motor outputs on your machine controller.  Keep an eye on gender to make surecontroller (make these female).  If you did the genders right, you'll be able to connect all the way fromshort machine controller to motor.<strong>cable &gt;&gt; long cable &gt;&gt; short motor cable.<strong> </strong> &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
<strong>Required know-how:</strong> <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> <strong> </strong> <strong>Tools and materials:</strong> &nbsp; <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable (24/6)</li> <li>6 male wire connectors (plugs)</li> <li>6 female wire connectors (receptacles)</li> <li>At least 36 each male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.)</li> </ul> &nbsp; [caption id="attachment_679" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="&quot;Helping hands&quot; are a must!"]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-679" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 1:</strong> Prep a length of multiconductor cable for each motor you plan to connect. I chose to make 3 x 4' lengths. It's a good idea to keep these wires on the short side so that they don't add too much resistance to the circuit. Strip ~2" of outer insulation from both ends of each multiconductor segment. Next, strip ~1/4" from each of the 6 individual conductors you find inside. You should also twist and "tin" (pre-solder) the tips of these exposed conductors so that they'll be easier to work with. Grab your bag of pins/sockets and solder one to every conductor, making sure to define one end of the cable segment as male and the other as female. You could probably get away with crimping, but I didn't have the right tool in the shop. [caption id="attachment_680" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="In Chicago we call that &quot;Blagojevich crooked&quot;."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-680" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 2:</strong> <strong> </strong> Stick the male pin wires into the back of the plug connector, then feed the female socket wires through the back of the receptacle connector.  The gender assignment of the connectors is counter intuitive, so refer to the image above. Now take a look at the front of your plugs. You'll note that the pins do no lock into place very well (especially if you ordered the wrong size pins like I did). To reinforce alignment, plug the two ends of your cable into one another. You should also check to make sure that your color coding is consistent:  each color should connect to itself. [caption id="attachment_681" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Finished cables."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-681" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step: 3</strong><strong>Step 3:</strong> Make sure that all pins are fully engaged with one another by looking at the plugs from the back. If a conductor is sticking out too far, you can push it back in with the edge of a jewler's screwdriver. Once you're satisfied that the wires are all mating correctly, bend the conductors to one side at the back of the plug and squirt some hot glue into each conductor channel. Once the glue cools, twist the conductors and tape for added reinforcement.  If you find that one of your pins is still positioned incorrectly, heat it up with the iron and reposition while the glue is warm. <strong>Step 4:</strong> Repeat steps 1-3 for your 6 short lengths of cable (I made them 12" long).  Three of these lengths will get soldered directly to your stepper motor wires.  The other three will be connected to the motor outputs on your machine controller.  Keep an eye on gender to make sure you'll be able to connect all the way from controller to motor.<strong> </strong> &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
<strong>Required know-how:</strong> <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> <strong> </strong> <strong>Tools and materials:</strong> &nbsp; <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable (24/6)</li> <li>6 male wire connectors (plugs)</li> <li>6 female wire connectors (receptacles)</li> <li>At least 36 each male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.)</li> </ul> &nbsp; [caption id="attachment_679" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="&quot;Helping hands&quot; are a must!"]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-679" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 1:</strong> Prep a length of multiconductor cable for each motor you plan to connect. I chose to make 3 x 4' lengths. It's a good idea to keep these wires on the short side so that they don't add too much resistance to the circuit. Strip ~2" of outer insulation from both ends of each multiconductor segment. Next, strip ~1/4" from each of the 6 individual conductors you find inside. You should also twist and "tin" (pre-solder) the tips of these exposed conductors so that they'll be easier to work with. Grab your bag of pins/sockets and solder one to every conductor, making sure to define one end of the cable segment as male and the other as female. You could probably get away with crimping, but I didn't have the right tool in the shop. [caption id="attachment_680" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="In Chicago we call that &quot;Blagojevich crooked&quot;."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-680" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 2:</strong> <strong> </strong> Stick the male pin wires into the back of the plug connector, then feed the female socket wires through the back of the receptacle connector.  The gender-assignmentgender assignment of the connectors is counter-intuitive,counter intuitive, so refer to the pictureimage above. TakeNow take a look at the front of your plugs. You'll note that the pins do no lock into place very well (especially if you ordered the wrong size pins like I did). To reinforce alignment, plug the two ends of your cable into one another. You should also check to make sure that your color coding is consistent:  each color should connect to itself. [caption id="attachment_681" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Finished cables."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-681" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step: 3</strong> xxxMake sure that all pins are fully engaged with one another by looking at the plugs from the back. If a conductor is sticking out too far, you can push it back in with the edge of a jewler's screwdriver. Once you're satisfied that the wires are all mating correctly, bend the conductors to one side at the back of the plug and squirt some hot glue into each conductor channel. Once the glue cools, twist the conductors and tape for added reinforcement.  If you find that one of your pins is still positioned incorrectly, heat it up with the iron and reposition while the glue is warm. &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
<strong>Required know-how:</strong> <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> <strong> </strong> <strong>Tools and materials:</strong> &nbsp; <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable (24/6)</li> <li>6 male wire connectors (plugs)</li> <li>6 female wire connectors (receptacles)</li> <li>At least 36 each male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.)<!--more--></li>ct.)</li> </ul> &nbsp; [caption id="attachment_679" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="&quot;Helping hands&quot; are a must!"]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-679" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 1:</strong> dddPrep a length of multiconductor cable for each motor you plan to connect. I chose to make 3 x 4' lengths. It's a good idea to keep these wires on the short side so that they don't add too much resistance to the circuit. Strip ~2" of outer insulation from both ends of each multiconductor segment. Next, strip ~1/4" from each of the 6 individual conductors you find inside. You should also twist and "tin" (pre-solder) the tips of these exposed conductors so that they'll be easier to work with. Grab your bag of pins/sockets and solder one to every conductor, making sure to define one end of the cable segment as male and the other as female. You could probably get away with crimping, but I didn't have the right tool in the shop. [caption id="attachment_680" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="In Chicago we call that &quot;Blagojevich crooked&quot;."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-680" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 2:</strong> <strong> </strong>ddd</strong> Stick the male pin wires into the back of the plug connector, then feed the female socket wires through the back of the receptacle connector.  The gender-assignment of the connectors is counter-intuitive, so refer to the picture above. Take a look at the front of your plugs. You'll note that the pins do no lock into place very well (especially if you ordered the wrong size pins like I did). To reinforce alignment, plug the two ends of your cable into one another. You should also check to make sure that your color coding is consistent:  each color should connect to itself. [caption id="attachment_681" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Finished cables."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-681" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step: 3</strong> xxx &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
<strong>Required know-how:</strong> <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> <strong> </strong> <strong>Tools and materials:</strong> &nbsp; <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable (24/6)</li> <li>6 male wire connectors (plugs)</li> <li>6 female wire connectors (receptacles)</li> <li>At least 36 each male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.)</li>ct.)<!--more--></li> </ul> [caption id="attachment_679" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="&quot;Helping hands&quot; are a must!"]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-679" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 1:</strong> ddd [caption id="attachment_680" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="In Chicago we call that &quot;Blagojevich crooked&quot;."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-680" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 2:</strong> <strong> </strong>ddd [caption id="attachment_681" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Finished cables."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-681" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step: 3</strong> xxx &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
Require know-how:<strong>Required know-how:</strong> <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> Tools<strong> </strong> <strong>Tools and materials:materials:</strong> &nbsp; <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable (24/6)</li> <li>6 male wire connectors (plugs)</li> <li>6 female wire connectors (receptacles)</li> <li>At least 36 each male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by 100 ct.)</li> </ul> [caption id="attachment_679" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="&quot;Helping hands&quot; are a must!"]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-679" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 1)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 1:</strong> ddd [caption id="attachment_680" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="In Chicago we call that &quot;Blagojevich crooked&quot;."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-680" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/2-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 2)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step 2:</strong> <strong> </strong>ddd [caption id="attachment_681" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Finished cables."]<a href="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-681" title="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" src="http://diylilcnc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/3-300x225.jpg" alt="Tutorial: Building your own stepper motor cables (image 3)" width="300" height="225" /></a>[/caption] <strong>Step: 3</strong> xxx &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
Require know-how: <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> Tools and materials: <ul> <li>Electrical tape</li> <li>Hot glue, glue gun</li> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable (24/6)</li> <li>6 male wire connectors (plugs)</li> <li>6 female wire connectors (receptacles)</li> <li>At least 36 each male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by</li>by 100 ct.)</li> </ul> &nbsp;

Revised 6 years ago
Require know-how: <ul> <li>soldering</li> </ul> Tools and materials: <ul> <li>Solder, soldering iron</li> <li>"Helping hands" part-holder</li> <li>3 long lengths and 6 short lengths of 24 gauge, 6-conductor cable (24/6)</li> <li>6 male wire connectors (plugs)</li> <li>6 female wire connectors (receptacles)</li> <li>At least 36 each male and female "pin and socket" connectors (usually sold by</li> </ul> &nbsp;

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